The Heroic Spirit Manifesto (Anime Ver) | Cafe Talk

Hi guys, so it would appear that I’ve missed this deadline by quite awhile. This post is about two weeks late, in fact. I’ll be posting some sort of mid-May update here soon to caption what’s been going on and why I haven’t been posting (though you could probably guess). This way, I can avoid cluttering up the hero week celebration. Welcome to café talk . . . ?

weareheroesreformatted

What was this post supposed to be about again?

That’s a good question, haha. Hero Week was ideally supposed to encompass my thoughts and reviews for four anime with heroes in them followed by a café talk to wrap everything up and conclude with a few of your guys’ thoughts.

Unfortunately, there were very few comments. On two posts, exactly zero. so I won’t be doing that part.

In huge part, this was all my bad. While I did get the first few reviews out on perfect schedule, I lacked the promotional qualities that would technically keep bringing people back. Little preparation went into setting up the “festivities.” In fact, I mainly set this all up as an excuse to review the recent flow of anime I had finished with heroes in them.

Another reason Hero Week fell pretty flat was – again, on my fault – the shows that I picked. ERASED was a good one, and it got the matching hits and comments it deserved. Since everyone has already talked about One Punch Man, I figured that it would attract little public eye. The hardest one to write, Yuki Yuna is a Hero, is the most obscure show on the list, and despite how much effort went into writing it, only a tiny handful of you checked it out — and that is FINE! As readers (and writers), we deem what we think is worth our time, and if it was worthwhile, we might even drop a like or a comment. As a content creator, I was a bit discouraged.

Then my dinky iPhone-published-on-the-spot My Hero Academia impressions post came out, and several of you rejoined the congregation. This was unexpected! While I didn’t feel it made up for the lack of activity on the previous ones, I was definitely happy to talk with all of you 🙂

So where does this leave us? I mean, why even bother? Because heroes should be celebrated, and also because I am NOT a quitter! I realize this was kinda a failed project (and I won’t rush into one like this again), but there were very important lessons learned during the process. Part of me is glad that it turned out like this just so that I can emerge even stronger and more knowledgeable about the whole ordeal. But enough about my pitfalls, let’s talk about what the heroic spirit means to some other popular anime (no spoilers)!

The Heroic Spirit Manifests in other Anime

Fate/Zero – Quite literally, the seven “heroic spirits” which are conjured up by the Holy Grail itself each contain their own ideology on heroism, some being more extreme than others. The majority believe, however, that heroes are leaders among the crowd, and they must continue to inspire their brethren in the pursuit of peace and triumph. They must be feared, awed, and worthy.

Attack on Titan – Heroes are hard to come by in this world overrun by gigantic zombies, but even those few reluctant heroes must spur comrades – and even humanity – to find the will to survive, and to be bold and brave during dark times.

Eden of the East – Twelve influential people are given the possibility change humanity for the better by transforming not only politics and economics, but also society itself. Though they all possess their own opinions on how the world should be saved, these heroes must give the average man or woman a sense of belonging and purpose in such an overwhelmingly crowded world.

Puella Magi Madoka Magica – All magical girls seem to do is fight bad guys with sparkles and pink dust, but this dark fantasy’s twist adds extreme weight to the biz. Whether it’s fighting to purge your mind of troublesome thoughts, clashing with others who oppose your methods, or moving forward (or going back) to save the lives of the ones you love, heroes must make devastating sacrifices and bear terrible burdens in order to protect those who are precious.

 

A Certain Scientific Railgun – In this massive network of a city for academics, darkness lurks behind forgotten alleyways and inaccessible files. To eliminate surface crime and the unspeakable evils of power and curiosity, heroes must possess good judgment and an open personality to keep their dearest friends out of the chaos. Consequently, they also must be able to accept a helping hand when faced against extreme odds.

Guilty Crown – Being ordinary is just dandy, but when accidents so tremendous shake the very foundation of science and human health, heroes must arise to the occasion and step up to bat when potential is thrust upon them. And in their pinnacle depression, they must be able to accept the guilt of others by transforming shame into valuable experience.

The Rose of Versailles – A life of luxury comes at the expense of others’ suffering. When that suffering becomes inhumanly great and revolution ignites on the horizon, a hero of passion, charisma, and valor must understand both sides of the spectrum before taking a stance.

I could go on until we’ve covered nearly every anime I’ve watched, but I think you get the picture.

Hopefully now you can see that in ERASED, heroes must be able to overcome trial and error by empathizing with the past. Or that in One Punch Man, heroes can be any guy off the street so long as they have fun fighting for the good of the cause. Or how about in Yuki Yuna is a Hero, where heroes must be able to bear the pain of others, however intense, and handle loss in order to keep them truly safe.

I’d like to conclude with one of the heartiest anime I’ve come across thus far: My Hero Academia. Loaded with stereotypes and gimmicks so cheesy and redundant that we know the outcome of every scene — But we still love it, why? Because heroes must be able to inspire others to do good deeds for the cause itself. They’re not out to eliminate all evil in the world, but to spread enough positive vibes that outdo negative potential.

Watching Izuku Midoriya stumble during every training session and getting back up again is what fuels us to believe that he is a hero. We can relate to him and the other students and heroes alike. All Might himself has decided to pass on his quirk, the culmination of strength of previous holders, to Izuku, which is proof from the get-go that Izuku has the capacity to serve the world well.

All of the celebrity-like heroes in My Hero Academia have this cool edge to them (beyond the neat costumes and variety of superpowers), and watching them soar in and save the day fills us with this familiar sense of well-being — like there truly is someone out there fighting behind the scenes for all of us and boosting our drive to right our wrongs, find hope, and smile through the pain. All of this isn’t set out to rid the world of evil, but more in the hopes that one day, we can inspire those around us and the world to do wonderful things.

To bring all of this in full circle conclusion, I TASK EACH AND EVERY ONE OF YOU to comment below with an anime title and how the HEROIC SPIRIT manifests itself within the story or characters. It’s hard to go wrong, especially after the examples I listed, and I know that you have some interesting things to say on the matter. Upon submitting your comment, you will have completed Takuto’s hero training courseCongratulations, and thank you for celebrating Hero Week with me!

What do we have in Common? WE ARE HEROES!

If I Went Missing . . . ERASED | Hero Week Review

One Punch Man is Absurd, Out-of-this-World Fun! | Hero Week Review

Loss Has Little Meaning in Yuki Yuna | Hero Week Review

My Hero Academia (Eps. 1-5) Thoughts | Hero Week

Above are the Hero Week reviews just in case you missed them the first time around and wish to check them out and/or add something to them. Sorry again for the late finale (consider this a lesson learned for myself) and I can’t wait to see you in the comment party! We can still make this awesome 😀

– Takuto, your host

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Ben-To Review

While ramen bowls and instant rice make for a quick, cheap meal, the premade bento box featured in grocery stores is the dinner for kings – some say it’s even to die for. Today, an anime centered on retrieving that ultimate dish not only for the driving guts, but for the incomparable glory.

Yo Sato, a high school pervert who revels in playing old SEGA games, decides to purchase a bento box from his local grocery store when he realizes that was his first mistake. Waking up from his unconscious state, he sees that all of the bento are gone. “Wolves,” intense brawlers who live thrive for the taste of a half-priced bento fight in the store until only the mighty survive. Yarizui, the “Ice Witch,” is the head of the Half-Pricer Club at his school, and upon his cold knockout, forces Sato to join the club and to enter the battle of the bento!

Taking an unnecessarily serious approach to the art of low-budget dining, Ben-To is hilarious. There really isn’t much more to say. It is a pure comedy, lacking any dark history or overly dramatic plot twists. The show is perfect for “rinsing your anime palette,” especially after watching something really intense.

The characters are also light-hearted. They each have their own unique names they are coined for: “Ice Witch,” “Lady of the Lake,” “Wizard,” so on and so forth. Over the course of the show, you begin to realize how they got their name, their concentrated strategies and styles, but most important, their motive and willingness to fight – the honor of the bento. None of the characters come from a distorted past, meaning that they are pure enjoyment! That’s not to say that “what you see is what you get,” however; you’ll be surprised by the interesting personas provided by each character.

It’s also amusing to watch the stereotypical archetypes duke it out in what? A grocery store. The quiet girl, the perverted girl, the ordinary high schooler, the “older sister,” the twins, the leader type – it all works, and it’s fascinating! J

I’ve never seen animation by Production David, but they did a fine job with the dramatic brawls that unfold in the store. And while the characters look really beautiful up close, specifically the eyes, even a couple feet away from the viewer the characters’ eyes appear really spaced out/messed up. It becomes distracting after a while, and during a few of the softer moments it kinda trashes the overall appeal.

Interestingly enough, the OST for Ben-To features many brass instrumentals, which is a cool change in music compared to other anime. For those who’ve seen it, it’s reminiscent of C: The Money of Soul and Possibility Control.

The saucy opening “LIVE for LIFE” by Aimi matches perfectly as far as lyrics and context. The in-depth views of characters in the supermarket make the scene look very busy, and in the anime, it most certainly is! In contrast, each day concludes peacefully with the ending, “Egao no Housoku” by Mariya Ise, featuring a soliloquy-esque spotlight by the cerulean-haired red-eyed babe Yarizui.

There is plenty of ecchi scenes and fanservice, and while I’d like to say it’s for the girls, for a change it’s actually for Sato. Oshiroi, the perverted girl and innocent classmate, never stops shipping Sato with the other boys and older men in the series. She reminds me of Rikka from Haganai. Characters such as the student council president or the head of the judo club also have a bolt to pick with him. As a guy, the natural hatred by the setting followed by the slow growth to fondness is comical. Besides this, there are still plenty of skin-revealing scenes for everyone, so yeah . . . awesome.

There isn’t really much else to add besides the known fact that Ben-To is a must-watch comedy series. The ”shop till you drop” story makes for fantastic hand-to-hand combat, my favorite being Shaga, though I also like Yarizui, and it never loses its touch. Though the show’s not family friendly because of the platefuls of fanservice, it’s definitely a great watch after a really sad/dramatic or intense thriller anime. Ben-To will make you hungry, so why wait? The laurel wreath sticker has been placed, the “Wolves” are ready at their marks, the doors close, finally BAM – it’s time to dine!!

“Say your thanks before you eat.” – Sen Yarizui

Thanks for checkin’ out my rather quick review of Ben-To, a comedy action series booming with fun! I have not seen the dub yet, but I love Trina Nishimura, so yeah, got to check it out. Please give me a like if you enjoyed the review, as it makes my day! Until next time, this has been

– Takuto, your host